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Four Strategic Pillars for A Healthier Population

Posted by Joe Antle on November 15, 2018 12:10 PM EST
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Helping People Help Each Other Help Themselves to...

Live Healthier Lives (Collaborative Wellbeing-Meets Healthy Communities Initiatives)

Improving organizational cultures is becoming more and more a science.  But the concept of finding the right key elements to driving rapid and sustained improvements in communities as it relates to improving population health and driving down healthcare costs is still evolving.  Certainly, the research on the concept of Collective Impact that is done by Stanford University and published in its Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) is a great starting point.

This blog does not begin to touch upon the great wealth of knowledge captured with SSIR.

This is just a layman's interpretation of the key points of leverage that can potentially drive improvements in population health.  Not perfect.....but a decent framework for exploring where changes and collaboration can produce meaningful results "at scale" in local communities.

· Healthy Communities-Leveraging the concepts of "collective impact" to enable key constituents to work together to help build healthier communities by creating programs/promotions/tools/services to connect them and coordinate actions.  By improving communications and integrating real actions the key constituents (government, healthcare providers, employers, educators, volunteers, friends and family and insurers) can make a measured positive difference.

· Healthy Organizations-Teamwork, alignment, execution against key priority activities, openness and sharing and working well together are the components every employer wants to add or improve to daily management.  Focusing on programs and promotions, using tools that support employee self-expression and visibility and accountability for activities that tie to a plan and enable 'winners" and key contributors to gain recognition and rewards will strengthen the culture for all organizations to get things done and let leadership evolve throughout all levels of the organization.

· Healthy Recovery-There are no examples of individuals accomplishing something that is almost impossible for them to achieve and sustain where the ingredients of human support from those who care, expert guidance and a plan for recovering and sustaining new life practices and tools for making sure that the new activities that lead to the ultimate goal of recovery/sustainability is not prevalent.  Applying teamwork and collaboration to people who have had to deal with big health issues is the big idea which is really "organic in nature".  The emotional, social and physical wellbeing that will issue from such programs render the use of medication and further procedures unnecessary.

· Healthy Me (We)-There are segments of the population who are inherently unhealthy.  The impact of an aging population and poverty and poor education programs increase the costs of healthcare throughout the healthcare system.  Obesity, some cancers, most incidents of heart disease, emotional health are areas that are chronic, and in some cases, reversible through healthier lifestyles, knowledge of health alternatives and the support of experts and everyday people who can become "healthcare heroes" to others who Iive unhealthy lives because they are unable, unwilling, uncertain and unmotivated to live healthier lives or understand how doing so can help them live better lives.

Clearly, there is overlap in each of these seemingly distinct areas of focus.  From a selling activity view, calls and meetings might naturally lead to one or more of these four areas to emerge as a focal point.  And in fact, it seems that your sales activities have led there already.

 

For example, using the region called Hampton Roads, Virginia, private sector employers who employ significant numbers of employees may only be a focus for Healthy Organizations.  Nonprofit employers like Eggleston Center and United Way may have overlap/leverage in Healthy Organizations and Healthy Communities.  But EVMS, the City of Norfolk and Healthy Suffolk would be several (Healthy Communities, Healthy Organizations and Healthy Me (We).  The two central Virginia projects may be (Healthy Communities and Healthy Recovery and Healthy Me (We)).  For healthcare organizations like Sentara or Optima Health or others there may be overlap in all four areas.

 

Just saying.....:)

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